under construction

lecture 1 - first part - mass percent

lecture 1 - second part - Density, definition and calculations

lect ure 2 - first part - Atomic structure - protons, neutrons, electrons, introducing isotopes

lecture 2 - second part - isotopes

lecture 2 - third part - definition of moles, Avogadro's number

lecture 2 - fourth part - an example of a mole problem

Lecture 3 - the equations written on the left board for review

Lecture 3 - part 1 - compound stoichiometry - converting molecular formula to percent with an example

Lecture 3 - part 2 - compound stoichiometry - converting from percent to the empirical formula - the example in reverse

Lecture 3 - part 3 - what is meant by empirical formula and the contract to molecular formula

Lecture 4 - part 1 -  Introduction to Reaction Stoichiometry

Lecture 4 - part 2 - Reaction stoichiometry - an example calculation (moles to moles)

Lecture 4 - part 3 - Reaction stoichiometry - an example calculation (grams to grams)

Lecture 4 - part 4 - A limiting reactant problem - do it twice and take the lower answer!

Lecture 5-part 1- introduction to electron quantum numbers - 1) principal quantum numbers

Lecture 5-part 2 - introduction to the subsidiary quantum number

Lecture 5-part 3 - the magnetic and spin quantum numbers

Lecture 5-part 4 - Using the aufbau principle to determine the quantum numbers in an atom

Lecture 5-part 5 - a start with the aufbau priniple to build up to boron

Lecture 5- summary of the aufbau principle method and building up to Ne 

Lecture 6-part 1 - introduction to electron configuration designations

Lecture 6-part 2 - correlation of the electron configuration to the periodic chart

Lecture 6-part 3 - selectrion rules

Lecture 6-part 4 - core designation and the importance of the core

Lecture 6-part 5 - some more about core electrons

Lecture 7-part 1 - Reasons for periodic trends and the example of atomic size.

Lecture 7-part 2 - Size of ions

Lecture 7-part 3 - Ionization Energy and Electron Affinity

Lecture 7-part 4 - some exceptions to the general trend due to some stable confiugurations

Lecture 7-part 5 - electronegativity

Lecture 8-part 1 - How to determine if a compound is ionic or covalent (and what are these)

Lecture 8-part 2 - Percent of ionic versus percent of covalent - how to make the destinction

Lecture 8-part 3 - Ionic versus covalent continued plus the mixed ionic-covalent compounds.

Lecture 8-part 4 - mixed ioic-covalent and the common polyions (to learn)

Lecture 9-part 1 - simple reactions from the elements to form ionic compounds

Lecture 9-part 2 - simple reactions continued - oxygen with metals

Lecture 9-part 3 - formation of metal peroxides and superoxides under dry conditions

Lecture 9-part 4 - a quick review of the item list (probably not usefut)

Lecture 10-part 1 - some comments about "unit factor" - introduction to percent yield, introduction to solutions, definitions of solids, liquids and gasses

Lecture 10-part 2 - molarity

Lecture 11-part 1 - dilution calculations

Lecture 11-part 2 - titration calculations

Lecture12-part 1- identifying strong acids (versus weak acids)
 
Lecture 12-part 2 - identifying strong bases, weak bases and slightly soluble bases (hydroxides)

Lecture 12-part 3 - non-redox reactions to form hydroxides from metal oxides and ternary acids from non-metal oxides

Lecture12-part 4 - reaction of water with a non-metal - non-metal compound to form two acids

Lecture 13-part 1 - Arrhenius versus Bronted-Lowry acid-base definitions (example: strong base reacting with a weak acid)

Lecture 13-part 2 - (example 2 strong ternary acid with a weak base - lost)
 
Lecture 13-part 3 -overall versus net ionic - example: precipitation reaction + spectator ions in acid-base reaction

Lecture 14-part 1 - redox reactions - predicting reactions from the elements including non-metal - non-metal reactions

Lecture 14-part 2 - covalent bonding - rule of 8(2) - definition of "terminal atom" and some conventions. 

Lecture 14-part 3 - continuation of rule of 8(2) with some conventions because we're lazy + comments about ionic charges

Lecture 14-part 4 - Too many electrons? - Period 3,4,5,6 can take 10 or 12 electrons is a central atom.

Lecture 15-part 1 - Introduction to hybridization

Lecture 15-part 2 - Molecular geometries from hybridization and missing terminal atoms

Lecture 15-part 3

Lecture 16-part 1

Lecture 16- part 2

Lecture 16-part 3