Roane State Community College

Division of Mathematics and Sciences

PHYS 2110

Calculus Based Physics I

 

COURSE INFORMATION

·         Course Type: Face to Face

·         Day and Time: Tuesday and Thursday, 9:30-10:50

·         Credit Hours: 4 credit hours ( 3 credit hours plus 1 credit hour for the required laboratory course)

·         Course Objectives: 

1. To understand the fundamental definitions and physical laws of classical mechanics, relativity, waves, sound, and heat.

2. To gain experience with a general systematic technique for solving problems and practice using it on problems in classical mechanics, relativity, waves, sound, and heat.

3. To improve the conceptual ability to select and apply the proper physical laws and concepts to obtain correct and reasonable solutions to problems in classical mechanics, relativity, waves, sound, and heat.

4. To apply the scientific method for the experimental evaluation of the physical concepts, theories, and laws of classical mechanics, relativity, waves, sound, and heat.

(Click this link for the detailed competencies)

·         Learning Outcomes:

1. Conduct and experiment, collect and analyze data, and interpret results in a laboratory setting

2. Analyze, evaluate, and test a scientific hypothesis

3. Use basic scientific language and processes, and be able to distinguish between scientific and non-scientific   explanations

4. Identify unifying principles and repeatable patterns in nature, the values of natural diversity, and apply them to problems or issues of a scientific nature

5. Analyze and discuss the impact of scientific discovery on human thought and behavior

·         Prerequisites for the course: Math 1910 Calculus I

·         Course Topics

Chapter in text

Topic

Problem Solving and How to Study and Prepare

Scientific Method

1

Physics, Space, Matter, and Time-Measurement

2

Motion in One Dimension

3

Vectors

4

Motion in Two and Three Dimensions

5

Force and Motion-Newton’s Laws

13

Gravitational Force

7

Work and Kinetic Energy

8

Potential Energy, Work & Conservation of Energy

9

Momentum and Impulse

10

Rotational Motion

15

Periodic Motion-Oscillations

16,17,18

Mechanical Waves and Sound

19

Temperature and Heat

39

Relativity

Chapter in text

Topic

 

·         Specific Course Requirements: Attend classes and perform lab experiments. Turn in class assignments and lab reports. Complete quizzes and exams.

·         Online Help Available: Physics Help and Math Help and Additional Math Help

TEXTBOOKS AND SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS

·         Textbook: Physics for Scientists and Engineers with Modern Physics by Serway and Jewett , 8th ed, Brooks/Cole Publisher, ISBN-13: 9781439048443.

·         Supplementary Materials: None

INSTRUCTOR  INFORMATION

·         Name:  Bill Murray

·         Office:  Roane State Oak Ridge, B-133 Cubicle F

·         Office Hours: Tuesday 11:00-3:25 , 4:30-4:45 and Thursday 11:00-11:30 , 12:30-2:00

click on link at right for detailed OFFICE HOURS

·         Phone: 865-481-2000 ext 5235

·         Email: murray@roanestate.edu

·         Homepage: http://www.roanestate.edu/webfolders/MURRAY/wpmurray.html

 

 

GRADING PROCEDURE AND GRADING SCALE

·         Assignments and Evaluations: Topics will be covered at about one topic per week.  Homework reading and problem assignments will be announced in class to practice the topics covered in class.  Three or more 100 point tests will be given. The tests will evaluate how well you have learned the topics covered in class since the last test.  Each test will be announced in class the week before the test. Quizzes of 5 to 20 points each will be used if needed. The quizzes may or may not be announced in class.  An optional Final Exam will be given at the scheduled exam period.

·         Grading procedure:

            Scores on tests represent a measurement of at least the following factors:

1. Student's knowledge of the material.
2. Test material difficulty.
3. Time available to complete tests.
4. Effectiveness of the teacher's instruction.
5. Numerous indirectly related things such as testing room
environment, health of student, etc.

Grades assigned to test scores are adjusted to minimize the factors other than the student's knowledge of the material by numerical ranking of the scores of class members and by comparison with scores from previous classes.

Letter grades will be discussed after each graded test, report, or assignment is returned.

 

Grading scale:

The final course grade is assigned by the same numerical ranking procedure using the student's accumulated total points for the course. The course’s final grade is determined using the following percentages:

 Laboratory Grade       25% of course grade
Tests and Quizzes      60%-75% of course grade
Optional Final Exam   0-15% of course grade

For students falling on the borderline between two grades, factors such as class attendance, class participation, and teamwork will be used to decide between the grades.                                                                                                                                             

 

PLAGIARISM AND ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

·         Academic Misconduct includes, but is not limited to, Plagiarism, Cheating, Fabrication and Facilitation.   Academic misconduct is prohibited.  Upon identification of misconduct, an instructor has the authority to assign an “F” or a zero for the exercise, the examination, or the entire course. Students guilty of academic misconduct that would typically result in the grade of “F” for the course will not be permitted to drop the class in which the academic misconduct occurred.  The instructor will contact the appropriate Division Dean who will then contact Records and request that an administrative hold be placed on the course in question.  The instructor will notify the student of the appropriate due process/appeal procedure.  The administrative hold will remain in place until the academic misconduct matter is concluded.

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

·         Qualified students with disabilities will be provided reasonable and necessary academic accommodations if determined eligible by the appropriate disability services office staff. Prior to granting disability accommodations in the course, the instructor must receive written verification of a student's eligibility for specific accommodations from the disability services office staff. It is the student's responsibility to initiate contact with the disability services staff and to follow the established procedures for having the accommodation notice sent to the instructor.

 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT  AND ADDITIONAL STUDENT RESOURCES

·         CTAT/HELP DESK: If you are having using your course web site tools please call CTAT at 865-882-4556, M-F, 9-5 EST. For all other technical problems call Help Desk at: 865-3543000 Ext 4357. 

 

SYLLABUS CHANGES

·         The  Instructor reserves the right to make changes to the syllabus as long as the students are notified.

 

 

Learning Principles:

Click this link for some useful  principle. ESSENTIALS OF LEARNING

 

 

 

 

 

 

GENERAL PROBLEM SOLVING PROCEDURE

1. DEFINE THE PROBLEM
1.1 UNDERSTAND THE PROBLEM.
1.2 SPECIFY THE DETAILS OF THE PROBLEM.
1.3 WRITE A DESCRIPTION OF THE PROBLEM.

2. VISUALIZE THE PROBLEM AND POSSIBLE SOLUTION METHODS
2.1 DRAW PICTURES OF THE PROBLEM.
2.2 DRAW DIAGRAMS OF THE PROBLEM.
2.3 PLAN POSSIBLE SOLUTION METHODS.
2.3.1 DRAW CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAMS OF POSSIBLE PROCEDURES.
2.3.2 DRAW PICTURES OF EXPECTED RESULTS FROM SOLUTION METHODS.

3. DESCRIBE WHAT KNOWN RESOURCES ARE AVAILABLE TO PRODUCE RESULTS
3.1 LABEL ALL PICTURES AND DIAGRAMS WITH THE KNOWN INFORMATION.
3.2 ASSIGN SYMBOLS TO KNOWN RESOURCES.
3.3 LIST ALL KNOWN CONDITIONS AND CHARACTERISTICS.

4. ANALYSIS OF THE PROBLEM
4.1 DESCRIBE WHAT RESULTS ARE NEEDED.
4.2 DESCRIBE THE UNKNOWNS WHICH NEED TO BE DETERMINED.
4.3 ASSIGN SYMBOLS TO EACH UNKNOWN DESCRIBED.

5. DESCRIBE THE PROCEDURES AVAILABLE TO PRODUCE THE RESULTS FROM RESOURCES
5.1 LIST ALL SET OF RULES (IN SYMBOLIC FORM) WHICH RELATE NEEDED
RESULTS AND RESOURCES.
5.2 LIST ALL FORMULAS IN SYMBOLIC FORM WHICH CAN BE USED TO
DETERMINE RESULTS FROM RESOURCES.
5.3 LIST ALL EQUATIONS IN SYMBOLIC FORM WHICH RELATE NEEDED RESULTS
TO RESOURCES.

6. SYNTHESIS OF A SOLUTION
6.1 USE THE AVAILABLE PROCEDURES TO PRODUCE THE DESIRED RESULTS FROM
THE KNOWN RESOURCES.
6.2 REPLACE THE SYMBOLS USED IN THE PROCEDURES WITH ACTUAL VALUES OF
KNOWN QUANTITIES.
6.3 DETERMINE THE VALUES OF ANY RESULTS WHICH CAN BE FOUND DIRECTLY BY
FOLLOWING THE RULES OR USING THE FORMULAS AND EQUATIONS.
6.4 USE THE RESOURCES AND ANY RESULTS NOW AVAILABLE TO DETERMINE OTHER
RESULTS.
6.5 USE THE AVAILABLE PROCEDURES (USING TRIAL AND ERROR WHEN
NECESSARY) TO DETERMINE THE REMAINING NEEDED RESULTS FROM THE
ALREADY CALCULATED RESULTS AND THE KNOWN RESOURCES. USE ALL THE
PROCEDURES UNTIL ALL THE POSSIBLE COMBINATIONS HAVE BEEN TRIED.

7. EVALUATE THE SOLUTION
7.1 IS THE SOLUTION POSSIBLE?
7.2 IS THE SOLUTION REASONABLE?